December 15, 2019
  • 7:50 PM 80’s Hi-NRG Mix ft. DJ Ram
  • 7:51 PM Friday Feel Good Quick Mix ~ Everybody’s Got A Little Light Under The Sun
  • 8:47 PM Friday Feel Good Quick Mix ~ Erotic City
  • 8:15 PM The Friday Feel Good Quick Mix ~ Let’s Get Down Old School Party Mix
  • 2:00 PM Friday Feel Good Quick Mix ~ Jump On This Old School Party Train

Friday Feel Good Quick Mix for Feb 21 2014

While watching some TV we saw the preview for the 1987 remake of “Robocop” the movie. Definitely a classic. The Remake will probably have a way bigger budget and better special effects, but I think I will wait to see it when it hits the RedBox. Robocop (the song) was released in 1988 by “The Sleeze Boyz”. The drum programing on the song was, no other than, Dr. Dre. Dr. Dre was former member of the World Class Wrecking Crew and was a DJ for the legendary Radio Station 1580 KDAY. Now, he makes his millions selling headphones, Beats by Dre. Just a little history of the 808. This mix will definitely take you back to the good ole days and will guarantee to make want to bust out the card board and star Break Dancing. Hope you enjoy the mix and learn the Robocop dance. Artist include: Sleeze Boyz, Egyptian Lover, Mantronix, Divin Sound, Orbit, World Class Wrecking Crew, Twilight 22, and many more…

Have a good weekend and Party Responsibly…

 

Among electro-boogie (later shortened as electro) pioneers include Zapp, D. Train,Sinnamon and other post-disco/boogie musicians; especially those influenced by New Wave and synthpop acts like Human League or Gary Numan, combined with the R&B sound of Herbie Hancock and George Clinton. As the electronic progression continued, acoustic instruments such as bass guitar were replaced by Japanese-made synthesizers and most notably by iconic drum machines like Roland TR-808. Early uses of this groovebox include several Yellow Magic Orchestra tracks in 1980-1981, the 1982 track “Planet Rock” by Afrikaa Bambaataa, and the 1982 song “Sexual Healing” by Marvin Gaye.

About electro origins, Greg Wilson argues:

It was all about stretching the boundaries that had begun to stifle black music, and its influences lay not only with German technopop wizards Kraftwerk, the acknowledged forefathers of pure electro, plus British futurist acts like the Human League and Gary Numan, but also with a number of pioneering black musicians. Major artists like Miles Davis, Sly Stone, Herbie Hancock, Stevie Wonder, legendary producer Norman Whitfield and, of course, George Clinton and his P Funk brigade, would all play their part in shaping this new sound via their innovative use of electronic instruments during the 70’s (and as early as the late 60’s in Miles Davis’s case).

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Dave Stylus

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